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afternoonsnoozebutton:

I am feeling this on a SPIRITUAL level this morning

fucksebastianstan:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

"Nerdy shit aside u can act like Superman"

fucksebastianstan:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

"Nerdy shit aside u can act like Superman"

the-real-goddamazon:

thechroniclesoflee:

sixpenceee:

First of all, that first statement is an overgeneralization. Not every Chinese person is going to be skilled at math of course. It’s ignorant to go into these stereotypes. 

But try this:

4,8,5,3,9,7,6.

Read them out loud to yourself. Now look away, and spend twenty seconds memorizing that sequence before saying them out loud again.

If you speak English, you have about a 50 percent chance of remembering that sequence perfectly If you’re Chinese, though, you’re almost certain to get it right every time. 

Why is this? 

One explanation is because the Chinese language allows them to read numbers faster. 

Chinese number words are remarkably brief. Most of them can be said in less than 1/4th of a second (for instance, 4 is ‘si’ and 7 ‘qi’)

Their English equivalents—”four,” “seven”—are longer: pronouncing them takes about 1/3 of a second. 

The English number system is also VERY illogical. 

For example, right after the word 10, instead of saying one-ten, two-ten, three-ten we have different words like 11,12. 

Not so in China, Japan and Korea. They have a logical counting system. Eleven is ten one. Twelve is ten two. Twenty-four is two ten four, and so on.

That difference means that Asian children learn to count much faster. Four year old Chinese children can count, on average, up to forty. American children, at that age, can only count to fifteen, and don’t reach forty until they’re 5 years old.

The regularity of their number systems also means that Asian children can perform basic functions—like addition—far more easily.

Ask an English seven-year-old to add thirty-seven plus twenty two, in her head, and she has to convert the words to numbers (37 + 22).

 Ask an Asian child to add three-tens-seven and two tens-two, and no translation is necessary. 

SOURCE: X

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Huh. That’s really interesting!

This makes so much more sense than the racist bullshit people come up with.

naamahdarling:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.
Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.
After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.
Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

I may start doing this.  Very cool.

naamahdarling:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.

Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.

After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.

Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

I may start doing this.  Very cool.

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together

Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency. It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use. This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.TL;DR: It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together


Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.

The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency.

It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use.

This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.

TL;DR:
It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

sharkchunks:

hellsquidsintl:

There was, of course, an increase in heart attacks and traffic accidents as people panicked trying to escape the ghost deer.

A significant decline in dementors as well.

sharkchunks:

hellsquidsintl:

There was, of course, an increase in heart attacks and traffic accidents as people panicked trying to escape the ghost deer.

A significant decline in dementors as well.

hisangelandimpala:

un-be-fucking-lievable:

prongsmydeer:

pottergenes:

james turning down every hogsmeade invitation by telling them he’s going stag

Sirius spreading a rumour that he has a cat just so when people ask him about it he can go, “Nah, I’m a dog person.”

Peter being loud so when a teacher chews him out, he can promise to be “quiet as a mouse”

Remus skipping meals so people can hear his stomach grumbling and he can apologise for being “hungry like the wolf.”

leticce:

WAIT WAIT WAT?

leticce:

WAIT WAIT WAT?